300 S. Ardmore Ave. Villa Park, IL 60181

Worship Times

Saturday - 4:30 pm Sunday - 8:00 am & 10:30 am Christian Education Sunday - 9:15 am

Everyone who acknowledges me before men,

I also will acknowledge

before my Father who is in heaven. Matthew 10:32

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pastor Rob Rogers was born in Seattle Washington. He has a B.A. in Communication from Concordia University, Austin, TX and a Masters of Divinity from Concordia Seminary in St. Louis, MO. READ MORE >>

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”And they devoted themselves to the apostles’ teaching and the fellowship, to the breaking of bread and the prayers.”  (Acts 2:42)

One time, Judy asked the High School youth what they wanted to do during the summer with regard to youth activities.  The answer was, “We don’t care what we do. We just like doing it with our friends.”  I think that holds true for adults as well.  In the book of Acts, we have a description of the life of the early Church.  They devoted themselves to the apostles’ teaching and the fellowship, to the breaking of bread and the prayers.  I want to focus on the fellowship.  This is not just “hanging out.”  Fellowship is more important than that.  Fellowship is being bound together as a people, as a family.  Fellowship is being a person who is connected to another person through a common bond, which primarily is the body and blood of Christ.

There was a time when we understood fellowship because we understood family.  Now, the family has unraveled.  Society is more mobile.  Many parents are divorced from each other and have married new spouses. People rarely have a set dinner hour. Kids live their own lives separate from the rest of the family. Both parents work full time and have less time and energy to devote to building and unifying the family.  Many families do not even vacation together after the children are past elementary school. So, it is not surprising that as fellowship in the family has unraveled, so too does fellowship in the Church.

If we are to regain the sense of family we once had at Church, we have to regain the fellowship we once had in the family.  I don’t think it is realistic to ask all the divorced people to remarry each other.  I don’t think that most families can withstand one of the parents quitting work and staying home.  I don’t think we can convince kids to give up their worldly freedoms.  Those cows are all out of the barn.  But what we can do is create the kind of love and community at the Church that we once experienced in the family.  I am becoming convinced that the Church is poised to become the place where people feel the love and acceptance, the fellowship, that they once only experienced in their families, particularly for people who, for whatever reason, have become disconnected from traditional families. 

We once depended on the model of the family to build the Church.  Now, I think we have entered a time when we depend on the Church to provide the family and in so doing, we will reach people with the love of God who otherwise might have slipped between the cracks of society.

 

June 2017

 

Jackson Scofield

 

First Communion

 

Life in the Chocolate Factory

 

The Lost Sheep

 

Homily by William Weedon

 

NEW YEAR'S RESOLUTIONS